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Since SMB owners have a million other things to think about other than website security, it is no surprise that many are unaware to how vulnerable they are to cyber criminals. Hackers target small business websites because there is plenty of valuable user data to exploit, and many sites are minimally monitored and ripe for the picking. The combination of lack of understanding about web security, and disbelief that their website would be targeted out of the 27 million business sites on the Web results in SMBs being at a real risk for a data breach.

To honor the recently passed National Cyber Security Awareness Month, we have put an infographic together outlining 10 ways a website can be protected using the entire network.

web security tips

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<p><a href="https://www.neweggbusiness.com/smartbuyer/visualized/website-security-use-entire-network-protection-infographic/"><img src='//www.neweggbusiness.com/smartbuyer/wp-content/uploads/website-security.png' alt='Website Security Tips' width='850' border='0' /></a><p>

Additionally, we engaged Sam Bowling, an infrastructure engineer at cloud services provider SingleHop, for a few extra tips on keeping your SMB website safe and secure.

  • Make sure you have secure password protection utilized at all levels of your network where it is available.
  • When working with your cloud or network hosting provider, make sure that you are using a dedicated server. Dedicated servers are the most secure type of network because they have the fewest number of attack points.
  • Make sure you are performing system security updates immediately after being notified of their existence. Generally these updates are created to fight a specific type of known attack, so by choosing to wait to update, you are making yourself (and your business!) more vulnerable to cyber attacks.

Website Security: Use Your Entire Network for Protection

Design by Dana Choi
Adam Lovinus

Author Adam Lovinus

A tech writer and Raspberry Pi enthusiast from Orange County, California.

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